If at first I don’t succeed…

After fixing the guitar body lining that I messed up in my last post, I went back to the shop today (fueled up on delicious Thanksgiving leftovers) determined to slow down, get in the zone, and cut the notches in the lining they way they should be. In the end I decided to try notching the braces into the lining for structural reasons, not acoustic reasons. The acoustics, as I mentioned in that post, are a matter of debate – how tightly coupled the back and sides are to the top is a matter of taste and tuning. But I’d read stories of braces coming loose over time and vibrating – supporting the brace ends by tucking them into the lining seems to help, and that explanation made sense to me.

A few careful saw cuts and chisel strokes later,

Cutting slots (in addition to the full slots already in the lining to provide flexibility) for the sides of the pocket.

Cutting slots (in addition to the full slots already in the lining to provide flexibility) for the sides of the pocket.

Chiseling out the waste of the pocket to the depth of the brace. The end of a top brace will tuck into this pocket.

Chiseling out the waste of the pocket to the depth of the brace. The end of a top brace will tuck into this pocket.

I had six pockets routed out on both the top and back sides of the lining. A preliminary fit of top and back showed I was in the ballpark – I may have to trim a smidgeon here and there before gluing, but that’s better than removing too much all at once. There will be a little but of ugliness in terms of the visual presentation (in some cases it was easier and safer to just remove two whole segments of the lining to the correct depth, rather than try to saw and leave a very thin and weak segment), but most of this work is not visible to casual inspection. Again, “just build the damn thing.”

No particularly deep lesson today, just a reminder that failure is an opportunity to learn and grow. While I lament the fact that there is no easy “undo” in woodworking, it does slow me down and focus my concentration in a particular way, and gives me real “failures” to recover from.

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